Film essays · Religion

Why a religious film like Menashe is superior to the usual propagandist bullshit.

We get them seemingly every year. You know, those sweet inoffensive films full of smiling characters, played by bad actors, in unrealistic settings who go on predictable journeys of realising Christianity is undoubtedly 100% true. Even typing it makes me want to throw up a little bit. Yet this has almost nothing to do with… Continue reading Why a religious film like Menashe is superior to the usual propagandist bullshit.

Film festivals

Breathe and The Shape of Water are set to become firm Oscar favourites.

Of the films I’ve seen at TIFF thus far, two stand out as ready to go head-to-head with Dunkirk in the main categories at the Oscars early next year. I’ve already said previously I expect The Current War to be nominated for Best Picture, but it will more than likely just be there to make… Continue reading Breathe and The Shape of Water are set to become firm Oscar favourites.

Film festivals · Film reviews

Super Size Me 2 is a vital lesson in critical thinking.

In the years since Morgan Spurlock’s first entertaining and informative documentary, Super Size Me (2004), the fast food industry seems to have… ‘changed’. Nowadays, it’s cool to be healthy. To eat free range, ethically sourced, organically fed meat. With no additives, no hormonal injections to increase growth, and heavens, absolutely no unpleasant images of those horrid… Continue reading Super Size Me 2 is a vital lesson in critical thinking.

Film festivals · Previews

TIFF preview: 15 films I’m excited for.

It’s festival season again, and this year my personal choice, mostly due to circumstance and slightly due to planning, is Toronto. Conveniently it’s also one of the biggest fall film festivals there is. A fair amount of movies premiering here will be found roaming the streets of Hollywood come Oscar time, I can guarantee. With… Continue reading TIFF preview: 15 films I’m excited for.

Film reviews

Contrasting architecture and relationships in Columbus.

Columbus is essentially a film about parental issues with a side of architecture; how relatives can hold us back without realising it; the importance of moving on from relationships, and learning to live for yourself rather than in someone else’s shadow. Characters here deal with situations in realistic, honest fashion, as well written as any… Continue reading Contrasting architecture and relationships in Columbus.